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Article Title:
Conway seeks to define 'alternative facts'
Article Quote:
Top White House advisor Kellyanne Conway is looking to define "alternative facts," an infamous phrase she took heat for creating during a TV interview.

In an interview with New York Magazine published Saturday, Conway explained that "alternative facts" aren't lies, but different ways to frame the same information.

"Two plus two is four. Three plus one is four. Partly cloudy, partly sunny. Glass half full, glass half empty. Those are alternative facts," she said.

Conway settled on a definition for the term: “Additional facts and alternative information.”
Comment:
2+2=4 and 3+1=4 are not "alternative facts". And, they have nothing to do with the context in which you first introduced the term.
Fallacy:

Semantics

The misleading use of a term with more than one meaning or sense (by glossing over which meaning is intended at a particular time).
""There is no such thing as an 'assault weapon'. What the killer used was an 'assault rifle'"."
Article Title:
“It’s tough to vote for policy that hurts people,”
Article Quote:
A growing number of GOP senators are hoping the House fails to pass its bill to repeal and replace ­ObamaCare so they won’t be blamed for killing it in the upper chamber.
Comment:
Then don't vote for it. Pretty simple, really.
Fallacy:

Cognitive Dissonance

The mental stress or discomfort experienced by an individual who holds two or more contradictory beliefs, ideas, or values at the same time
"An environmentally responsible individual who purchases a car that does not get very good gas mileage."
Article Title:
"We can’t ask them to continue to pay for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting."
Article Quote:
Trump’s budget, which Mulvaney said was assembled in part by examining excerpts from the president’s speeches and media interviews, delivers on his campaign promise to build up the military, designating an additional $54 billion in defense spending. The budget pays for that additional spending by cutting funding to nearly every other department, including 21 percent budget cuts at the departments of Labor and Agriculture, 28 percent at the State Department and 31 percent at the Environmental Protection Agency.

“When you start looking at places that we reduce spending, one of the questions we asked was can we really continue to ask a coal miner in West Virginia or a single mom in Detroit to pay for these programs? The answer was no,” Mulvaney said Thursday morning on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.” “We can ask them to pay for defense, and we will, but we can’t ask them to continue to pay for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.”

Federal funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting would be cut entirely under Trump’s budget blueprint, which also reduces spending on the Coast Guard by 14 percent and FEMA by 11 percent.
Comment:
I don't think that's how taxes are supposed to work.
Fallacy:

Relativist Fallacy

Claiming something is true for one person, but not for someone else when, in fact, it is true for everyone (objective) as demonstrated by empirical evidence.
"A: You realize that smoking is unhealthy. B: Smoking is unhealthy for most people, but it is not true for me."
Article Title:
“It pisses me off, but my wife pisses me off, too, and we’re still married,”
Article Quote:
One Trump voter, who owns a cabinet making shop in House Speaker Paul Ryan’s (R-WI) district, told Bloomberg that he still supports the president even though he is angry about the tax cuts.

“It pisses me off, but my wife pisses me off, too, and we’re still married,” Dan Peuschold explained.

Peuschold said that he and his 15 employees did not make enough to take advantage of the tax cuts. And he argued that the wealthy could afford to pay higher taxes.

“I don’t like the cut because it’s pocket change for them,” he insisted. “Us guys that work all the time don’t have the deep pockets. It’s us people who are in the middle class who are the backbone of this country.”
Comment:
Perfect definition of Cognitive Dissonance.
Fallacy:

Cognitive Dissonance

The mental stress or discomfort experienced by an individual who holds two or more contradictory beliefs, ideas, or values at the same time
"An environmentally responsible individual who purchases a car that does not get very good gas mileage."
Article Title:
Crowley calls plagiarism scandal a 'political hit job'
Article Quote:
Monica Crowley is insisting that the plagiarism scandal that cost her a job as President Trump’s national security spokesperson was a “political hit job.”

The conservative pundit broke her silence on the controversy Tuesday night during an appearance on Sean Hannity’s Fox News show.

“What happened to me was a despicable, straight-up political hit job, OK?” Crowley said. “It’s been debunked, my editor has completely supported me and backed me up.”
Comment:
Debunked by you and your editor? Sorry, that's not how this works.
Fallacy:

Red Herring

An irrelevant topic is presented in order to divert attention from the original issue.
"The president cheated on his taxes. So what? Some previous presidents have cheated on their spouses."
Article Title:
White House calls CBO health care report bogus
Article Quote:
Unbelievable, wrong and “virtually impossible.”

That was how President Donald Trump’s administration responded Monday to the Congressional Budget Office’s politically damaging score of House Republicans’ plan to repeal and replace Obamacare.

The nonpartisan CBO projected that the bill, the American Health Care Act, would insure 24 million fewer Americans than Obamacare by 2026 but reduce the federal deficit by $337 billion in the same span.

“We disagree strenuously with the report that was put out,” Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price told reporters after leaving a Cabinet meeting with Trump at the White House. “It's just not believable is what we would suggest.”
Comment:
Alternative facts?
Fallacy:

Appeal to Consequences of a Belief

Concluding that an idea or proposition is true or false because the consequences of it being true or false are desirable or undesirable.
"If unicorns aren't real, then I would be very disappointed. I don't want to be disappointed, so I believe they exist."
Article Title:
"Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated."
Article Quote:
President Donald Trump on Monday claimed that “nobody knew that health care could be so complicated,” and again flirted with the idea that Republicans should let Obamacare “implode” so that Democrats shoulder the blame.

Even as he re-upped his commitment to repealing and replacing Obamacare during separate gatherings with governors and insurance CEOs, Trump appeared to nod to the grim political reality of yanking away the increasingly popular law.

"Let it be a disaster, because we can blame that on the Dems that are in our room -- and we can blame that on the Democrats and President Obama," Trump said in remarks to the National Governors Association. "But we have to do what's right, because Obamacare is a failed disaster."
Comment:
Fallacy:

Moving the Goalposts

Demanding that an opponent address a different topic after the first claim has been proven true. Or changing a claim after it was proven false.
"John claimed to be psychic. Under scientific conditions, he was not able to prove his ability to be psychic. John explained that the conditions were disabling his abilities."
Article Title:
President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team has signaled to congressional Republican leaders that the President-elect’s preference is to fund the border wall through the appropriations process as soon as April, according to House Republican officials.
Article Quote:
The move would break a key campaign promise when Trump repeatedly said he would force Mexico to pay for the construction of the wall along the border.

The Trump team argues it will have the authority through a Bush-era 2006 law to build the wall, lawmakers say, but it lacks the money to do so. Transition officials have told House GOP leaders in private meetings they’d like to pay for the wall in the funding bill, a senior House GOP source said.

“It was not done in the Obama administration, so by funding the authorization that’s already happened a decade ago, we could start the process of meeting Mr. Trump’s campaign pledge to secure the border,” Indiana Republican Rep. Luke Messer said on Thursday.

Messer admitted it’s “big dollars, but it’s a question of priorities.” He pointed to a border security bill that Homeland Security Chairman Mike McCaul proposed last year that cost roughly $10 billion.

Republicans point out that then-Sen. Barack Obama, Sen. Chuck Schumer and then-Sen. Hillary Clinton voted for the 2006 bill and argued that since Democrats backed that bill, they should support efforts to fund the current effort.
Comment:
Did I say Mexico was going to pay for it? Just joking.
Fallacy:

Moving the Goalposts

Demanding that an opponent address a different topic after the first claim has been proven true. Or changing a claim after it was proven false.
"John claimed to be psychic. Under scientific conditions, he was not able to prove his ability to be psychic. John explained that the conditions were disabling his abilities."
Article Title:
'a smart businessman like Trump would let that happen.'
Article Quote:
“Asked about policies found in several Republican plans to replace the Affordable Care Act — including a tax credit to help defray the cost of premiums, a tax-preferred savings account and a large deductible typical of catastrophic coverage — several of these Trump voters recoiled, calling such proposals ‘not insurance at all,'” the Times writes.

That said, some of these voters also said they didn’t think Trump and the GOP would really go through with enacting such plans.

“When told Mr. Trump might embrace a plan that included these elements, and particularly very high deductibles, they expressed disbelief,” writes the Times. “They were also worried about what they called ‘chaos’ if there was a gap between repealing and replacing Obamacare. But most did not think that, as one participant put it, ‘a smart businessman like Trump would let that happen.'”
Comment:
But why wouldn't he do what he promised?
Fallacy:

Appeal to Wishful Thinking

Suggesting a claim is true or false because you hope it is.
"The president wouldn't lie. He's a good person who would never do that."
Article Title:
“Apparently there’s yet a new standard now, which is to not confirm a Supreme Court nominee at all,”
Article Quote:
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on Wednesday that he will not tolerate Democratic efforts to block President-elect Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee. McConnell’s remarks come just a day after Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer suggested that Democrats would block a Trump nominee for the vacant spot on the high court, in retaliation for the GOP’s refusal to hold hearings on President Obama’s choice, Merrick Garland. McConnell invoked the so-called “Biden rule,” and said it means that a nomination should not be confirmed in an election year. But Biden’s actual remarks in 1992 were referring to the period before the election, meaning a nomination could be voted on and confirmed after Election Day. “Apparently there’s yet a new standard now, which is to not confirm a Supreme Court nominee at all,” McConnell said, adding: “We’ll be looking forward to receiving a Supreme Court nomination and moving forward on it.”
Comment:
But it was ok when YOU did it?
Fallacy:

Moving the Goalposts

Demanding that an opponent address a different topic after the first claim has been proven true. Or changing a claim after it was proven false.
"John claimed to be psychic. Under scientific conditions, he was not able to prove his ability to be psychic. John explained that the conditions were disabling his abilities."
Article Title:
“There hasn’t been a nuclear war yet.”
Article Quote:
During a discussion with host Don Lemon on Trump tweeting threats at North Korea’s Kim Jung Un, CNN regular Bakari Sellers took McEnany to task for Trump’s “dangerous” rhetoric.

“I agree with you, no idea why the media covers them the way they do” Sellers said. “They lack context, do a disservice to the American public and I don’t think they’re newsworthy.”

“That’s first,” he continued. “Second, they’re dangerous. Donald Trump’s tweets are dangerous. Good friend Kayleigh just casually talked about a tweet of North Korea sending a ballistic missile to the United States. You simply can’t do that as President of the United States and dealing with diplomacy and more importantly with nuclear weapons. I think everyone wants Donald Trump to step up to the mantle of President of the United States and he can use social media in provocative and good ways. But foreign policy and some of the dangerous things he tweets out, it deserves more than 140 characters.”

“And we’re still here,” McEnany glibly replied. “There hasn’t been a nuclear war yet,” at which point the entire panel could be heard exclaiming.
Comment:
Just because it hasn't happened yet, doesn't mean it can't happen.
Fallacy:

Affirming a Disjunct

Making the false assumption that when presented with an either/or possibility, that if one of the options is true that the other one must be false.
"We must either build the wall, or illegal immigrants will come into the country. We have built the wall, therefore no illegal immigrants will come into the country."
Article Title:
Creationist Ken Ham flips out after paper claims no dinosaurs on Noah’s Ark
Article Quote:
“Hey Washington Post, we at Ark Encounter have NEVER said Dinosaurs were wiped out during Flood — get your facts right,” he wrote. “I challenge Washington Post to show ONE instance where Ark Encounter supposedly says Dinos died out during Flood!”

The reality, says Ham, is that Noah brought dinosaurs on board with him.
Comment:
Well that certainly makes mores sense now.
Fallacy:

Pandering

The act of expressing one's views in accordance with the likes of a group to which one is attempting to appeal.
"If you give me a chance by voting for me, the result for you will be amazing."
Article Title:
“I think Christians should accept and adopt Jesus’ view of the Bible,”
Article Quote:
“I think Christians should accept and adopt Jesus’ view of the Bible,” prominent pastor and author Tim Keller tweeted just before Christmas. “He regarded it as absolutely true and authoritative, in every word.”
Comment:
Uh, I don't think the Bible was around during Jesus lifetime.
Fallacy:

Begging the Question

A form of argument where the conclusion is assumed in one of the premises.
"Psychic abilities are real, because I have experienced what can only be described as a psychic event."
Article Title:
Gingrich: Possible top Trump aide worked in finance, so not anti-Semitic
Article Quote:
Less than 24 hours after one of President-elect Donald Trump’s closest advisers said his chief of staff pick was “imminent,” former House speaker Newt Gingrich denied that a favored candidate for that position, Stephen Bannon, had any association with the anti-Semitic alt-right movement.

On the Sunday morning CBS show Face the Nation, Gingrich was asked by host John Dickerson to respond to an essay in the conservative magazine National Review about the fringe of anti-Semites who supported Trump’s improbable rise to the White House.

Gingrich retorted by calling the piece “garbage” and added that Bannon has worked for Goldman Sachs and in the Hollywood film production industry — references to two arenas highly associated with Jews.
Comment:
So if I work for a company headed by a Jew, I can't possibly be anti-Semitic. Good to know.
Fallacy:

Undistributed Middle

Because two things share a property, they must be the same.
"All lions are mammals. All cats are mammals.Therefore, all lions are cats. Likewise, all ghosts are imaginary. All unicorns are imaginary. Therefore, all ghosts are unicorns."
Article Title:
Trump Says He’s Open to Preserving Parts Of Obamacare
Article Quote:
Mr. Trump said he favors keeping the prohibition against insurers denying coverage because of patients’ existing conditions, and a provision that allows parents to provide years of additional coverage for children on their insurance policies.

“I like those very much,” Mr. Trump said in the interview.

When asked why he shifted on his stance from an out-and-out repeal to possibly just an amended version of Obamacare, it appears that his 90-minute conversation with President Barack Obama made his rethink it a bit.
Comment:
One of many "he didn't really mean it" backtracks.
Fallacy:

Ad Hoc Rescue

Arguing for a belief by repeatedly revising the argument to explain problems with the premise.
"A: I know that the president will repeal Obamacare. B: But congress has to repeal Obamacare, not the president. A: Well, the president will work with congress to repeal Obamacare."
Article Title:
Trump U Lawyers Ask That Trial Be Postponed Until After Inauguration
Article Quote:
“This has been a gut-wrenching campaign, as everybody knows, and the nation is just beginning the long healing process,” he told reporters later, according to the same report. “And I think the last thing we need right now is to have a trial about events that occurred six years ago or seven years ago, in which Mr. Trump—President-elect Trump—is a personal defendant in matters completely unrelated to the momentous obligations that he now needs to deal with.”
Comment:
Wonder why they didn't have a problem with Hillary's investigation during the days up until the election?
Fallacy:

Appeal to Pity

The attempt to distract from the truth of the conclusion by the use of pity.
"Brittany doesn't deserve the bad press. Hasn't she already been through enough?"